3 tips on eating mindfully

You are what you eat (absorb). Every human cell in your body is made of the building blocks of what you consume. I’m currently breastfeeding my son who is 4 months old and it amazes how chubby he is getting each day. However, as adults, we have autonomy on the food choices we make daily and at times we can be oblivious of what’s happening in our bodies on the cellular level. Other than getting fresh air and sunshine for vitamin D, the only other thing that we have complete control of when it comes to our health and wellbeing, is what we consume.

90% of our immune system is in our GIT (gastro-intestinal track) because it’s the most intimate way humans have a direct connection to our environment. For example, when a mother kisses her baby, her body is responding to any pathogens that are pickup from her saliva which sends a message to the body to change the composition of the breastmilk for antibodies for the baby to fight the infection.

I think the majority of us have weaknesses to certain types of foods like chocolate, cake, cookies and my personal favourite, cheese! This is not to say you have to give up on all your vices. It’s about incorporating more balance in your diet to literately build a healthy body and a strong immune system through the food you eat and supporting the microbiome that resides in your intestinal tract. After all, we are made up of more bacterial cells than human cells!

Here are 3 tips to help you become more aware of what you are consuming:

  1. Start to eat mindfully, as you chew your food, take your time. Make mental commentary on the flavour and texture. Even before you put food in your mouth, notice it’s colour and smell. Whether your eating smashed avocado on rice cakes or a doughnut, being consciously aware of what you are eating is the first step in acknowledging how food plays an important part in how you feel.
  2. Chew, chew, chew! We don’t chew long enough. I’m constantly having to tell my threeanger to stop shoving food down his throat and chew. Chewing is the first step in digestion. Give your GIT a helping hand. When your food is well chewed, it makes it so much easier for the rest of your body to break it down and nourish you.
  3. Takes breaks in between each mouthful. Families come together around the dining room table to connect and share food. It’s a wonderful opportunity to talk and share stories. Taking breaks between mouthfuls helps your body recognised when you are full. You’re less likely to overeat and again it’s better for your digestive health.

Join to my mailing list for more tips and support, aswell as exclusive offers for my subscribers only. Subscribe

Share:

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

On Key

Related Posts

First Facebook Class of 2022, Hormones and Your Skin

Is Your Skin Acting Moody?   Hormones are biochemical messengers that influence everything from our memory to our metabolism, our sleep to our sex drive. Throughout our lives, our hormone levels fluctuate. Hormones are also dependent on varying lifestyle factors and genetic makeup. When hormones are at healthy levels, our bodies are working their best,

​​How do I stop bingeing over Christmas?

The Brain and Food Connection Around the Festive Season As an Aussie one of the best Christmas’s I’ve ever experienced was in Ireland. Nothing beats a cold Christmas especially with the touristy hope of snow! I remember walking through Dublin stores just mesmerised by how excited the Irish got into Christmas. They had a Christmas

Photo by ROMAN ODINTSOV from Pexels

Liver – The unsung hero of your menstrual cycle

Have you ever gone on a detox and cleanse? The fact is that our bodies are constantly detoxing. Our liver is such an important organ because it’s responsible for cleaning your clean, breaking down toxins and excess hormones to be removed from our body. It also breaks down carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals to

Are there risks associated with the Covid-19 vaccination during pregnancy?

Tonight I decided to stay up and read a study that was completed on the Preliminary Findings of mRNA Covid-19 Vaccine Safety in Pregnant Persons. Of the 827 pregnant women, 13.9% resulted in pregnancy loss and there were 221 pregnancy-related adverse events, the most frequently reported event was spontaneous abortion (46 cases). It’s important to

Are you part of the community?

Join my support group to help working professionals and entrepreneurs with period disorders regulate their cycle so they can have more energy and feel empowered by their fertility health.